SUPPORTED PROJECTS

Action Sampiri: conservation of endangered parrot species on the Sangihe & Talaud Islands

Jon Riley

The Sangihe and Talaud islands support three of Indonesia’s four endangered parrot species; these are: Red-and -blue Lory Eos histrio, Sangihe Hanging-parrot (Loriculus catamene) and Blue-naped Parrot (Tanygnathus lucionensis). In 1998, Action Sampiri, a joint Indonesian-British follow-up project will undertake an integrated conservation awareness and research project, targeting the endangered parrots of Sangihe and Talaud. Building on their 1995 surveys on the islands of Talaud and Sangihe in Indonesia, the team returned in 1996 to initiate a conservation programme for the endangered Red-and-blue Lory (Eos histrio) and undertook further research on the islands' endemic avifauna. Fieldwork in 1996 provided a more detailed analysis of the status, distribution and ecological requirements of the globally threatened species, complemented by an assessment of the extent of and threats to their forest habitats. This facilitated the development of an integrated conservation plan to assist with the long-term survival of the islands' endemic avifauna and key habitats. A preliminary investigation was made into methods to alleviate trapping of the Lory. An education programme was initiated to provide local people with information on the islands' ecology and threatened wildlife, placing particular emphasis on the Red and Blue Lory. This included the establishment of a temporary Project Sampiri office and distribution of visuals such as 30,000 stickers, and 1,000 posters and a bird booklet. This year activities on Sangihe and Talaud will take place in four broad areas: awareness work with local communities; training and development of Forestry Conservation Department officials; consultation and co-ordination with local government officials; further research into the status, ecology and conservation of endangered parrot species. The project has a budget of £25,000, spending approximately 6 months on Sangihe and 6 months on Karekelang, Talaud.

Previous Project